Mother Nature Dislikes Everyone Equally

I know it’s surprising to find out that roofing contractors cannot control the weather. How were they supposed to know that it was going to be Spring in February? It got up to 70 degrees for Pete’s sake! Then, here comes along March, giving us not only a wind storm, but then snow! Does Mother Nature not realize Saint Patrick’s Day is here?



Most everyone knows that Global Warming is impacting our lives and our world in which we all live in. But somehow, people don’t transfer that knowledge and understanding to businesses. No, I’m not here to give you a tree-hugger schpeel -- but just for your information, trees make for excellent huggers -- however, I am here to tell you how your understanding is something we need in order to have a peaceful, loving exchange of goods and services.

 

                  


So yes, it may feel bizarre, as if you are losing your brain, but try to schedule appointments when the weather is nice, even if it’s in February. Roofing contractors, and the people that work for them, are mere mortals, just like you and I, and they do not possess the ability to predict the future; nor have they obtained a degree in meteorology. I know it’s shocking, but they rely on the Weather Channel just like you. They go to weather.com, check out the 10-day forecast and realize, “Crap it’s snowing this week, we need to reschedule.” 



I know you’re thinking, “Why can’t they do a roof estimate anyways?” Have you ever tried climbing over a frozen, icy, snowy roof before? Let me tell you, it’s not pleasant, and it’s not safe. Besides that factor, in order to actually figure out your estimate, they need to be able to see the extent of the full damage, or lack thereof, and if there’s a white powdery substance covering your roof, they very much well can’t do that.



No one likes the weather playing games with them, including roofing contractors, but it’s just something that’s part of the business. So please understand, they don’t know that there would be a wind storm knocking off shingles, and then the next week it would snow, covering up the damage previously created.